Tips For Fullbacks Football America - Sports Predictions

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Tips For Fullbacks Football America

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Fullback (gridiron football) explained

Fullback (gridiron football) explained

A fullback (FB) is a position in the offensive backfield in American and Canadian football, and is one of the two running back positions along with the halfback. Typically, fullbacks are larger than halfbacks and in most offensive schemes their duties are split between power running, pass catching, and blocking for both the quarterback and the other running back. [1]

Many great runners in the history of American football have been fullbacks, including Jim Brown, Marion Motley, Jim Taylor, Franco Harris, Larry Csonka, John Riggins, Christian Okoye, and Levi Jackson. However, many of these runners would retroactively be labeled as halfbacks, due to their position as the primary ball carrier; they were primarily listed as fullbacks due to their size and did not often perform the run-blocking duties expected of modern fullbacks. Examples of players who have excelled at the hybrid running-blocking-pass catching role include Mike Alstott and Lorenzo Neal.

In the days before two platoons, the fullback was usually the team's punter and drop kicker. [2] When at the beginning of the 20th century, a penalty was introduced for hitting the opposing kicker after a kick, the foul was at first called "running into the fullback", inasmuch as the deepest back usually did the kicking. [3]

In modern play, the term "fullback" is a misnomer. Before the emergence of the T-formation in the 1940s, most teams used four offensive backs on every play: a quarterback, two halfbacks, and a fullback. The quarterback began each play a quarter of the way back, the halfbacks began each play side by side and halfway back, and the fullback began each play the farthest back. In the modern game, when the quarterback is under center, the fullback most often lines up directly behind the quarterback and in front of the halfback or tailback.

Characteristics

Fullbacks are typically known less for speed and agility and more for muscularity and the ability to shed tackles. In the modern NFL, fullbacks, while occasionally deployed as ball carriers, are often primarily a lead blocker to allow running backs to get to the secondary of the opposing team's defense. In the early 2000s, many NFL teams used blocking fullbacks, such as Tony Richardson and Lorenzo Neal, with great success. These backs cleared the way for some of the decade's great running backs. Recently, some teams have phased the fullback position out of their offense all together, with those teams either all but eschewing the I-formation, or instead utilizing either a tight end, h-back, or backup running back in the role. There are still fullbacks who remaining prominent in the NFL, among them Aaron Ripkowski, Jamize Olawale, James Develin, John Kuhn, Patrick DiMarco, Mike Tolbert, Kyle Juszczyk, and Marcel Reece. However, in spite of their usually infrequent carries in modern NFL offenses, some fullbacks have led their team in rushing. Notably Le'Ron McClain was the rushing leader for the Baltimore Ravens in 2008 and Tony Richardson led the Kansas City Chiefs in rushing in 2000. Giants running back Peyton Hillis started his NFL career as a fullback before being reverted into a halfback.

Although technically a running back, typically fullbacks are primarily valued for their blocking in most modern-day offenses. The most common and simple runs, the Dive and the Blast, both employ the fullback as the primary blocker to "make way" for the halfback. In the flexbone formation, however, the fullback (sometimes referred to as the B-back) can often be used as the primary rushing threat. In many other offensive schemes, the fullback is used as a receiver, especially when the defense blitzes. In selected plays, some teams will have a defensive lineman report as an eligible receiver to line up as a fullback ("Jumbo" or "Heavy Jumbo") or tight end in a "Miami" package in goalline formation. Examples of such players who have been frequently used as situational fullbacks include Haloti Ngata, Dontari Poe, Jared Allen while with the Kansas City Chiefs, Richard Seymour while with the New England Patriots, and Isaac Sopoaga while with the San Francisco 49ers, while Dan Klecko and Nikita Whitlock have played both as a defensive tackle and fullback. Defensive Tackle William "The Refrigerator" Perry scored a touchdown in Super Bowl XX from the fullback position.

Substitutes

Most teams in the NFL do not have a substitute fullback, though there are exceptions. The role can be filled by backup or number three or four tight ends or bigger and less-frequently-used running backs. In modern offenses, fullbacks in an I-formation can be motioned into a 2-TE formation or H-back formation, making a running back or tight end fairly well suited to the role.

The position is less frequently used in Canadian football, which focuses more on passing than running the ball.

Other articles

Fullback (American football game) - Memidex dictionary

fullback (American football game) Definition:

the position of a back on a football team

act noun (acts and actions)

Topic: Member of: Original source: Definition references Collins Dictionary:

[soccer, hockey] one of two defensive players positioned in front of the goalkeeper | [rugby] a defensive player positioned close to his own line | . (23 of 373 words, 3 definitions, 5 usage examples, pronunciation)

Fullback [disambiguation] | Full back

may refer to: In sports: A position in various kinds of football, including: Full back (association football), in association football (soccer), a defender playing in a wide position | Fullback (American football), in American football (gridiron), a . (36 of 136 words, 7 definitions)

American Heritage Dictionary: fullback | FB [abbreviation]

[football] ; An offensive backfield player whose position is behind the . | The position of this player. | [sports] ; A primarily defensive . (22 of 61 words, 4 definitions, pronunciation)

Macmillan British Dictionary: fullback [countable/uncountable] | fullbacks [plural]

in sports such as football or hockey, a defensive position near your team's goal or a player in this position | in American football, the offense . (25 of 59 words, 2 definitions, pronunciation)

Merriam-Webster:

an offensive football back used primarily for line plunges and blocking | a primarily defensive player usually stationed nearest the defended goal (as . (22 of 51 words, 2 definitions, pronunciation)

Oxford Dictionary:

Syllabification: (full·back) | [football] : an offensive player in the backfield. | (in a game such as soccer or field hockey) a player in a defensive . (24 of 50 words, 3 definitions, pronunciation)

Random House Dictionary: fullback [football]

a running back who lines up behind the quarterback and is farthest from the line of scrimmage. | the position played by this back. | [soccer, rugby, . (25 of 50 words, 3 definitions, pronunciation)

Wiktionary: fullback | fullbacks [plural]

[American football] An offensive back whose primary jobs are to block in advance of the halfback on running plays and for the quarterback on passing plays. | [field hockey] A defensive player who assists the goalie in preventing the opposing team from . (41 of 43 words, 2 definitions)

New World Dictionary: fullback | FB [football, abbreviation]

[football] one of the running backs, used typically for blocking | [soccer, rugby, etc.] a defensive player who generally plays back in the defensive . (23 of 39 words, 2 definitions, pronunciation)

Cambridge Dictionary:

a defending player in games such as football and hockey who plays near the end of the field, or a player in American football whose team has control . (28 of 36 words, pronunciation)

Encarta Dictionary: fullback | fullbacks [plural] | fb [sports, abbreviation]

in football, a player in the offensive backfield who lines up behind the quarterback and is used mainly for blocking | in sports such as soccer, . (25 of 60 words, 3 definitions, pronunciation)

encarta​.msn​.com​/dictionary 1861673614​/definition​.html   [offline]

Audio references Collins Dictionary:

Audio: British English pronunciation of "fullback"

Macmillan British Dictionary: fullback [countable/uncountable] | fullbacks [plural]

Audio: British English pronunciation of "fullback"

Macmillan American Dictionary: fullback [countable/uncountable] | fullbacks [plural]

Audio: North American pronunciation of "fullback"

Cambridge Dictionary:

Audio 1: British English pronunuciation of "fullback"

Audio 2: North American English pronunuciation of "fullback"

the Free Dictionary:

Audio 1: North American English pronunciation of "fullback"

Audio 2: British English pronunciation of "fullback"

Audio 3: North American English pronunciation of "fullback" by speech synthesizer

Google Dictionary: fullback | fullbacks [plural]

Audio: English pronunciation of "fullback"

Merriam-Webster Pronunciation:

Audio: North American pronunciation of "fullback"

YourDictionary Audio:

Audio: North American English pronunciation of "fullback" by speech synthesizer

Sam Byram: Everton deal for full-back not concluded - Steve Evans - BBC Sport

Sam Byram: Everton deal for full-back not concluded - Steve Evans

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Leeds United head coach Steve Evans remains hopeful that he will be able to select full-back Sam Byram for Saturday's game at Sheffield Wednesday.

Leeds accepted a bid from Everton for the 22-year-old on Thursday.

"Sam Byram has come into training today (Friday). His advisors are having a chat with Everton, but just because they're talking it doesn't mean it's done," Evans told BBC Radio Leeds.

"If it doesn't look like being finished I expect to be able to play him."

Byram is out of contract in the summer and has turned down a new deal through to 2017 at Elland Road.

He came through the club's academy and has made 143 appearances, scoring 10 times.

Evans added: "I'll be very disappointed if he does go because he's been one of our best players in the last six or seven weeks and he's been fantastic off the pitch.

"At the same time, we will have sent someone off who doesn't want to sign a contract here and he goes to play in the Premier League.

"I'm not 100% sure he'll leave. It might be in the high 90s but until he sits here and shakes my hand then I will still be hopeful."

Byram has played 24 times and scored three goals for Leeds this season.

Evans, who took over at the Championship club in November, feels that the club should have done more to avoid Byram's contract situation reaching this stage.

"It's easy to say but if I had been head coach in the summer then Sam would have signed a new deal," Evans said.

"I tried as best I could to get people back around the table but I have to accept that the bridge had broken down a little bit.

"For as long as I am the head coach here, we will be doing everything we can to make sure this position doesn't happen again."

Find all the latest football transfers on our dedicated page.

Fullback_(American_football): definition of Fullback_(American_football) and synonyms of Fullback_(American_football) (English)

Fullback (American football) From Wikipedia

In American football, a fullback (FB) is a position in the offensive backfield. Traditionally, the duties of a fullback are split between power running and blocking for the quarterback on passing plays, and the running back on running plays.

Many of the great runners of the history of American football have been fullbacks, notably Jim Brown, Franco Harris, and Larry Csonka, but in recent years the position has evolved to be more a blocker than a runner, with occasional pass-catching duties. While some teams have actually phased-out fullbacks altogether in favor of two tight end sets, the remaining prominent fullbacks in the NFL such as Lorenzo Neal and Lawrence Vickers are typically employed for breaking through tight defensive alignments, often in short-yardage situations as they are usually larger and heavier than halfbacks or tailbacks, or for screen passes. As a result, fullbacks are typically known less for speed and agility and more for muscularity and the ability to shed tackles. However, Le'Ron McClain was the rushing leader for the Baltimore Ravens in 2008, being deployed from the fullback position.

Although a running back by name, typically fullbacks are valued by their contributions to the running game by their blocking.

fr:Fullbackhu:Fullbackko:풀백 (미식축구)it:Fullbackpt:Fullbacknl:Fullback (American football)simple:Fullback

Fullback (American football) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In American football, a fullback (FB) is a position in the offensive backfield. Traditionally, the duties of a fullback are split between power running and blocking for the quarterback on passing plays, and the running back on running plays.

Many of the great runners of the history of American football have been fullbacks, notably Jim Brown, Franco Harris, and Larry Csonka, but in recent years the position has evolved to be more a blocker than a runner, with occasional pass-catching duties. While some teams have actually phased-out fullbacks altogether in favor of two tight end sets, the remaining prominent fullbacks in the NFL such as Lorenzo Neal and Lawrence Vickers are typically employed for breaking through tight defensive alignments, often in short-yardage situations as they are usually larger and heavier than halfbacks or tailbacks, or for screen passes. As a result, fullbacks are typically known less for speed and agility and more for muscularity and the ability to shed tackles. However, Le'Ron McClain was the rushing leader for the Baltimore Ravens in 2008, being deployed from the fullback position.

Although a running back by name, typically fullbacks are valued by their contributions to the running game by their blocking.

fr:Fullbackhu:Fullbackko:풀백 (미식축구)it:Fullbackpt:Fullbacknl:Fullback (American football)simple:Fullback

All translations of Fullback_(American_football)

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Player Positions in American Football

Player Positions in American Football

Football For Dummies, 5th Edition

When two opposing American football teams meet on the gridiron (playing field), the player positions depend on whether the football team is playing offense or defense. Football pits the offense, the team with the ball, against the defense, which tries to prevent the offense from scoring. Each side lines up facing the other with the football in the middle.

The players on the offensive side of the ball include the

Quarterback: The leader of the team. He calls the plays in the huddle, yells the signals at the line of scrimmage, and receives the ball from the center. Then he hands off the ball to a running back, throws it to a receiver, or runs with it.

Center: The player who snaps the ball to the quarterback. He handles the ball on every play.

Running back: A player who runs with the football. Running backs are also referred to as tailbacks, halfbacks, and rushers.

Fullback: A player who’s responsible for blocking for the running back and also for pass-blocking to protect the quarterback. Fullbacks, who are generally bigger than running backs, are short-yardage runners.

Wide receiver: A player who uses his speed and quickness to elude defenders and catch the football. Teams use as many as two to four wide receivers on every play.

Tight end: A player who serves as a receiver and also as a blocker. This player lines up beside the offensive tackle to the right or the left of the quarterback.

Left guard and right guard: The inner two members of the offensive line, whose jobs are to block for and protect the quarterback and ball carriers.

Left tackle and right tackle: The outer two members of the offensive line.

The players on the defensive side of the ball include the

Defensive tackle: The inner two members of the defensive line, whose jobs are to maintain their positions in order to stop a running play or run through a gap in the offensive line to pressure the quarterback or disrupt the backfield formation.

Defensive end: The outer two members of the defensive line. Generally, their jobs are to overcome offensive blocking and meet in the backfield, where they combine to tackle the quarterback or ball carrier. On running plays to the outside, they’re responsible for forcing the ball carrier either out of bounds or toward (into) the pursuit of their defensive teammates.

Linebacker: These players line up behind the defensive linemen and generally are regarded as the team’s best tacklers. Depending on the formation, most teams employ either three or four linebackers on every play. Linebackers often have the dual role of defending the run and the pass.

Safety: The players who line up the deepest in the secondary — the last line of defense. There are free safeties and strong safeties, and they must defend the deep pass and the run.

Cornerback: The players who line up on the wide parts of the field, generally opposite the offensive receivers.

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